Learning lessons from Leicester City

Being part of a successful team

Published in Training Journal

The underdogs did it. Despite starting the season at 5,000:1 outsiders, Leicester City secured the Premiership title last night amongst much merriment in the Midlands and a sense of benign disbelief in the football world. From Brazil to Bahrain, from Birmingham to Bangkok, everybody’s second favourite team has triumphed against the odds.

It’s an old learning and training trope that we can use sporting metaphors to shed some light on organisational issues and skills development in particular but there are four reasons why I think that the success of Leicester City may have some wider resonance.

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By | 2017-09-05T08:58:58+00:00 May 3rd, 2016|Categories: Learning & Development, L&D articles|
Robin Hoyle, Head of Learning & Technology
Robin has spent almost three decades as a strategic L&D leader, trainer and consultant. As a writer and blogger he focuses on workforce development policies, learning strategies, tools and techniques. He has written two books, ‘Informal Learning in Organizations: How to Create a Continuous Learning Culture’ and ‘Complete Training: From Recruitment to Retirement’, both published by Kogan Page. Robin is a Fellow of the Learning and Performance Institute and the Chair of the World of Learning Conference. In his role as Head of Learning and Technology for Huthwaite International, he is exploring routes to enhancing the learning experience and the impact of all Huthwaite’s training and learning interventions.